Kansas

Kansas is a state with a diverse range of real estate investment opportunities. The state has a strong economy, with a diverse range of industries and a growing population. This can create demand for housing and make Kansas an attractive market for real estate investment. Property rentals and short term rentals, such as vacation rentals, can be popular in Kansas due to the state's many tourist attractions and the large number of people who travel there for work or events. Metropolitan areas such as Wichita and Kansas City have strong job markets and a relatively low cost of living, making them attractive markets for real estate investment. When considering real estate investing in Kansas, it is important to research local market conditions and do your due diligence to make informed decisions and maximize the potential return on your investments. Factors to consider include the condition of the property, the demand for rentals in the area, and the potential for appreciation. By thoroughly researching the Kansas real estate market, investors can make informed decisions and maximize the potential return on their investments.

Sustainability Resources

The Real Estate industry is one of the most environmentally damaging industries in the world accounting for:
30%
of total carbon dioxide
40%
of all energy
40%
of all raw materials
Our goal is to give you the resources you need to take sustainable action in improving, building, retrofitting and revamping your home. The impacts are real, the benefits significant, and the need critical. Join us in bringing sustainability home and creating a brighter future for all, starting with you.

Save money and do the world a favor!
Here's a list of Sustainability Initiatives in the area:

The Sustainable SITES Initiative

This tool provides guidelines and a rating system used to assess the sustainability of landscapes and suggests improvements.

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Pearl Certification

The Pearl certification can be earned based on a property's performance in the following categories: buidling shell, heating & cooling, baseload, home management, renewable energy and energy storage. There are 4 levels of certification all of which reflect highly on a home's performance, sustainability, and value.

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Save Energy With a Home Energy Audit

The Home Energy Check up by PE&G offers personalized, suggested improvements that can help you save energy and costs.

Learn More

Kansas FAQs

Is Kansas a judicial or non-judicial state?

Judicial

In a judicial foreclosure state, the lender must go through the court system in order to foreclose on a property. This process can be longer and more expensive for the lender compared to a non-judicial foreclosure.
In a judicial foreclosure state, the lender must go through the court system in order to foreclose on a property. This process can be longer and more expensive for the lender compared to a non-judicial foreclosure.

What is the process of closing on a property in Kansas?

Title companies, lenders, real estate agents, attorneys, and independent escrow firms all conduct closings. Anyone who conducts a title search must be a licensed abstracter, a designation one receives after passing strict tests and meeting various requirements. Because many land titles stem from Indian origins, deeds involving Indians as parties to a transaction go before the Indian Commission for approval. Conveyance is by warranty deed. Mortgages are the customary security instruments. Judicial foreclosures, the only ones allowed, take about 6 months from filing to sale. Redemption periods vary, the longest being 12 months. Kansans use ALTA policies and endorsements. Buyers and sellers divide closing costs. Buyers pay the lender’s policy costs and the state mortgage taxes; sellers pay for the owner’s policy. Property taxes come due November 1st, but they needn’t be paid in a lump sum until December 31st. They may also be paid in two installments, the first on December 20th and the second on June 20th.

Property Taxes in Kansas?

Due November 1st and paid in two installments, December 20th and June 20th

In Kansas, does a property management company require a real estate broker's license?

IT DEPENDS. Key components of property management (renting and leasing) are considered real estate activities under existing Kansas real estate licensing laws as they apply to nonresidential property only. Therefore, a real estate broker's license is not required if the property being rented out or leased is a residential property. A license is required if the property is commercial. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

Are there any exceptions to the requirement that a property manager have a broker's license in Kansas?

YES. For example, if that property manager owns 5% or greater in the business or association that owns the commercial property, a real estate broker's license is not required. For more information about these and other Kansas property management requirements and exceptions, please contact the Kansas Real Estate Commission. Before hiring a property manager to manage your Kansas rental property, you should always check that he or she is licensed appropriately. You can check the license status of Kansas property managers by name or by company.

Do you need a broker's license to manage community associations in Kansas?

NO. A broker's license is not required to manage community associations or condo associations in Kansas.

Kansas Real Estate Broker Requirements

Title companies, lenders, real estate agents, attorneys, and independent escrow firms all conduct closings. Anyone who conducts a title search must be a licensed abstracter, a designation one receives after passing strict tests and meeting various requirements. Because many land titles stem from Indian origins, deeds involving Indians as parties to a transaction go before the Indian Commission for approval. Conveyance is by warranty deed. Mortgages are the customary security instruments. Judicial foreclosures, the only ones allowed, take about 6 months from filing to sale. Redemption periods vary, the longest being 12 months. Kansans use ALTA policies and endorsements. Buyers and sellers divide closing costs. Buyers pay the lender’s policy costs and the state mortgage taxes; sellers pay for the owner’s policy. Property taxes come due November 1st, but they needn’t be paid in a lump sum until December 31st. They may also be paid in two installments, the first on December 20th and the second on June 20th.

Kansas Real Estate Salesperson Requirements

Due November 1st and paid in two installments, December 20th and June 20th

How do property ownership transfers work in Kansas?

Warranty deed.

Cities